Browsed by
Month: April 2016

More Hollow Ways

More Hollow Ways

Bill Riley writes: ‘We have many multiple hollow ways here in Wiltshire; this is one of my favourite examples, just south of Marlborough. The road on the right, with the cars, has been the main road (A346) since 1921. The prominent road branching out of it, from right to left, is the former turnpike and main road abandoned (not diverted) in 1921.’ The photograph comes from Archaeology In The Field by OGS Crawford (1953).

Biblical Proportions

Biblical Proportions

There has been a lot of rain in Cumbria since Christmas. The Old Coach Road at Threlkeld has been generally robust and resilient through decades of living memory, but now water has badly scoured a downhill section. The Cumbria Group of the Trail Riders Fellowship has erected advisory notices on the road and is recommending particularly that heavier vehicles keep off until repairs can be organised.  

Fanning Out

Fanning Out

Multiple hollow ways along one road corridor are not at all unusual, and this is a nice example which shows just how regular horse, horse-drawn, and droving traffic must once have been on roads that are long-bypassed by lower, better-made highways. This is Hexham Lane in County Durham. It was set out as a public carriage road in a late 18th Century inclosure award, but is also shown as part of a long route from Catterick Bridge to Hexham on Moll’s map…

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Foy Sauce

Foy Sauce

Long-time readers of Byway and Bridleway might recall a report in issue 1990/10/40 on the case of Foy v. Hertfordshire County Council, also briefly reported in The Times on 4 May 1990. Mr & Mrs Foy had fenced off part of a some roadside waste forming part of the Lower Icknield Way. A public footpath runs along the edge of the triangle of waste. The council took enforcement action and the Foys appealed, with Mrs Foy ultimately and unsuccessfully taking…

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Conflict of Evidence: No Resolution?

Conflict of Evidence: No Resolution?

In a ‘user evidence’ order relying on s.31 of the Highways Act 1980, you need a ‘bringing into question’ date from which to count back twenty full years of user, next before. In the decision letter for a claimed public footpath in the Lake District, FPS/Q9495/7/32, Inspector Susan Doran cannot identify an event that brings the claimed right into question, and she declines to confirm the order as a consequence. But hold on … didn’t the CRoW Act sixteen years ago…

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